Tuesday, 6 July 2010

Holly reports on the She Says ‘SCAMP’ conference

On Thursday 1st July 2010, the boardrooms and creative departments of London’s digital agencies were utterly bereft of females. More so than usual, I mean. Because they were all at ‘SCAMP’, the first conference of She Says – the women-focused creative organisation that aims to provide networking and role models for women in digital.



The theme of the conference was “work in progress”, and the eight speakers were intentionally proportioned 7 women to 1 man, in an attempt to reverse the usual 80/20 male/female speaker ratio at advertising conferences. They talked about work they’re doing now, how it developed from initial ideas, and where they’d like to take things in the future.


The lovely LBI bar - the setting for post-SCAMP networking

A couple of highlights of the day:

Katy Lindemann, Strategist

Katy talked about “happiness hacking” – that is, bringing the joy found in games into the real world – a concept inspired by game designer Jane McGonigal. Katy told us about a game called Chromaroma that makes use of Oyster card data to “make travel magical”. Users can hold the record for the fastest journey between two tube stops, for instance, or accept missions like visiting Cockfosters station within a week to be declared “Cock of the North”. In this way, it has similarities to Foursquare, but it could have another purpose, too.

Katy explained that TfL were willing to share their Oyster data because they believe Chromaroma could help them to change behavior patterns on London transport. For example, could people be persuaded to use transport at off-peak times, or visit lesser-used stations? There’s huge potential. Find out more about Chromaroma here.

Candace Kuss, Hill & Knowlton

Candace talked about the rise of the “pro-am” (professional amateur – bloggers and creators who use the same tools and are as highly-followed as the pros) and the perils of UGC.

The main bit of advice I took from Candace's talk was that:“Humour is the best way to talk in any of these [social online] platforms. If you want to have the communication with people, you’re going to have to liven it up a bit”. Couldn't agree more.

For more about She Says’s regular talks and gatherings (men are allowed, despite what you may have heard), visit their website here.

7 comments:

candace kuss said...

hi Holly — must say this event was way more fun than the average conference.

Just to clarify the record, I would never advise BP, or any brand in crisis, to use humour. That advice is more about humanizing the brand in social spaces in general.

Collective said...

Hi Candace, thanks for your comment. I've removed that bit of the paragraph so no-one misinterprets it.

And I definitely agree about the fun factor - here's hoping there'll be another SCAMP at some point.

johndelacruz said...

Love the coverage .... just wanted to point out that three of my Advertising and Brand Management students were involved with the Scamp conference and the light-painting logo for "Scamp", is part of a body of work they made for the event. And one of the team, Sonia Ahmed, also gave a presentation on the day. So, well done, and a worthwhile group indeed!

Collective said...

Hi John, thanks for your comment. I really enjoyed Sonia's presentation - it was great to see all the thought and preparation that went into the branding for the event. It was good to hear they had fun with it too.

Good job all round, I reckon.

johndelacruz said...

Thanks for the comment, "Collective". Is there any possibility we could call on you for a live brief this upcoming academic year?

UniversalMedia said...

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Walt Bayliss
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UniversalMedia said...

Well Said.
Good post deserve more recognition.
don't forget there are ways where you can get hundreds of subscribers to your blog :)
Walt Bayliss
CEO and Founder
http://www.instantblogsubscribers.com